fbpx

FORD RANGER REVIEWS | 2015 – 2019 MODEL

Share the knowledge

Read and compare reviews on the Ford Ranger 2015 – 2019 Model from top New Zealand automotive journalists on trusted websites.

Mitsubishi Triton

Inside the four biggest changes to the 2019 Ford Ranger

Driven Ford Ranger Review

SOURCE: DRIVEN | YEAR: 2018 | WORDS: MATTHEW HANSEN | PHOTOS: MATTHEW HANSEN

Driven have just returned from the launch of the MY2019 Ford Ranger line-up, held over in (a slightly damp) Melbourne.

From a starting point near the airport, journos eager to get acquainted with Ford‘s revised double-cab drove inland to Daylesford, before circling around to the Melbourne 4×4 Training and Proving Ground facility in Werribee.

Now, many would struggle to pick the new model next to the current edition — you know, the one that’s laying waste to New Zealand’s sales charts. Our full debrief from the Ranger’s Melbourne debut will air in next Wednesday’s edition of Driven, but in the meantime here’s an ‘instant expert’ summary of what’s changed for the most popular vehicle in the country.

‘Raptor’ four banger

The Ranger’s line-up of engines grows from two to three, as the four-cylinder 2.0-litre bi-turbo diesel (157kW, 500Nm) best known for its application in the Raptor joins the four-cylinder 2.2-litre turbo-diesel (118kW, 385Nm) and the popular five-cylinder 3.2-litre turbo-diesel (147kW, 470Nm).

It will only be available in the range-topping Wildtrak model, at a $1000 premium over the 3.2-litre alternative and fitted exclusively with the new 10-speed automatic transmission (everything else in the range has to settle for either the tried-and-true six-speed automatic).

2018 Ford Ranger FX4 Review

AutoTrader Ford Ranger Review

SOURCE: AUTOTRADER | YEAR: 2018 | WORDS: ANDY ENRIGHT | PHOTOS: ANDY ENRIGHT

Ford’s tradie-tough ute scrubs up nicely with the FX4 special edition

It’s taken a bit of time, but manufacturers are slowly catching on to the fact that 4×4 ute buyers often have a few dollars in their pockets. Whereas the ute was once a no-nonsense workhorse, things are changing, and fast.

Ford’s Ranger is the nation’s favourite in this class and, in FX4 special editionguise, it gets a whole lot of extra gear over the XLT model it’s ostensibly based on. But is all the window dressing worth the extra coin?

Not so very long ago, floating the idea of a Ford Ranger being a better buy than a Toyota Hilux would have had you skittled off a construction project faster than turning up without the right protective footwear. These days the Ford’s superiority is a widely accepted fact. The Ranger is Ford’s best-selling vehicle in Australia and for good reason. Ford listened to what ute buyers wanted and priced the Ranger sensibly.

2019 Ford Ranger XLT Review

Ford Ranger review by Driveline

SOURCE: DRIVELINE | YEAR: 2018 | WORDS: COLIN BOWER

There’s no doubt the design people at Ford got it right with a blend of crisp styling and straight lines morphing into curves in all the right places.

The newly released Ranger is basically a freshen up of a proven formula but with an optional 2-litre bi-turbo powerhouse at the top of the range.

But I didn’t drive that, preferring to assess the 3.2L XLT model that is popular with my customers.
It’s a bit of a step up into the smart pilot’s seat… but once there the view is impressive in all directions but a little snug. That is a tad surprising considering the impression of size from the outside. I had to slide the driver’s seat forward to accommodate my computer case in the right rear foot-well, and my passenger commented that it didn’t feel any more comfortable than her Swift, but to be fair there is a lot packed into the passenger area. Everything has a solid, quality feel with a familiar layout, intuitive controls and nicely laid out dials.

Moving away, I definitely liked the surge of power and was pleasantly surprised at the quietness of the 3.2 litre 5-cylinder turbo diesel engine.

2018 Ford Ranger Raptor Review – Ranger gets wings

SOURCE: AUTOCAR | YEAR: 2018 | WORDS: KYLE CASSIDY | PHOTOS: TOM GASNIER

Ford Performance carved itself a niche in the lucrative pick-up market in the US when it spawned the F-150 Raptor.

Inspired by desert racers, it’s a truck designed to go fast off road. Now it has applied the formula to the Ranger, designed as a factory-built, high-speed desert runner. Sounds pretty cool but you may be thinking how exactly will that work in New Zealand? We’re still wondering too.

But after a dusty yet exhilarating day behind the wheel in the rural back blocks of Australia’s Northern Territories, it sure proved capable, both on tarmac and in the rough, even if the engine’s just a 2.0-litre. Nah, really.

The Raptor Recipe

The three key Raptor ingredients are its chassis, tyres and suspension. The ladder frame they’ve made more robust with sections constructed from higher strength steels, added stiffeners and a chassis-mounted front bumper system while a 2.3mm bash plate guards the engine.

The track grows by 150mm with cast aluminium A-arms up front, and outboard coil-over suspension which allows for more travel.

Mitsubishi Triton

Share the knowledge